Course Descriptions

Georgia Institute of Technology

English 1102 — Spring 2012

ENGL 1102: Extraordinary Bodies and Brilliant Minds:  Representations of Disability in Literature and Culture

This course will examine the ways that disability (and differing ability) is represented in literature and culture.  Drawing from “texts” including literature, film, essays, interviews and guest presentations , our discussion will cover a range of topics from the disabled body as spectacle, autism and creativity, technology and the body, and universal access and design.  We will apply what we have learned from our readings and our discussions to different types of communication projects including traditional papers, blog entries, a visual presentation, and a multimedia final project. Through an intensive process of reading, discussing, writing, and editing, we will practice the communication and critical thinking skills that you will need as a Georgia Tech student and as a future professional.

 

English 1102 – Spring and Fall 2011

This section of English 1102 will examine London as it is depicted in literature and as it functions as a center of literary production. Using texts including newspapers, diary entries, maps, poetry, and fiction we will compare the “real” London with the fictional London and use that comparison to uncover the ideas, anxieties, and identities that the city inspires. Units will discuss issues such as urbanization, disease in the city, industrialization, immigration, and terrorism. Over the course of the semester we will read Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, Charles Dickens’s Oliver Twist, Virginia Woolf’s Mrs. Dalloway, T.S Eliot’s The Waste Land and Ian McEwan’s Saturday as well as short selections from essays, poetry, and historical texts. We will apply what we have learned from our readings and our discussions to research and write papers and to develop projects which will practice critical thinking and writing skills and which deploy all the elements of WOVEN communication.

English 1101 – Fall 2010

Born Digital:  Navigating a World Gone Wired.

This section of English 1101 will examine the new generation of people, material artifacts, and information that are “born digital.”  For people, this means that they are born into, and have only ever known, a world that prioritizes all forms of digitization; for materials and information, it means that they only exist in digital form. The questions that the phenomenon of being “born digital” raises will be the focus of our class, questions like: how do we mediate between our “real” and our “digital” identities?; how does digital communication affect the way we interact?; what is lost when material things become digitized, like our photographs or our books?; how do we organize and store digital information?; will museums become obsolete?; and what kind of problems does digitization create?  Starting off with a trip to Emory’s multimedia exhibit on writer Salman Rushdie, “A World Mapped by Stories,” we will apply what we have learned from our readings and our discussions to different types of communication projects including traditional papers, blog entries, a poster presentation, and a multimedia final project. Through an intensive process of reading, discussing, writing, and editing, we will practice the communication and critical thinking skills that you will need as a Georgia Tech student, and as a citizen of the digital world.

You can follow along with our discussion at our class blog.

English 1102:  Spring 2009

Machines and Monsters:  Technology in Literature from Steam Engines to Steam Punk

Writing has always been not only a place to represent emerging technologies but also to speculate on the future of technology in general. Fascinatingly, some contemporary writers choose to look backwards and imagine a world in which technology moves us in different direction, re-imagining the world as it might have been. In the first half of this course, we will look at the way that nineteenth-century writers imagined the future of technology and its effects on society. In the second half we will turn to modern and contemporary writers and film-makers to examine how they represent and refigure technologies of the past in an imaginary future. Using the genre of “Steampunk” which is founded on a nostalgia for the age of the Industrial Revolution, we will explore technology’s relationship to contemporary culture and literature. Through an intensive process of reading, discussing, writing, and editing, we will critically examine texts ranging from novels (including Frankenstein and The Time Machine) to films and cartoons and apply our questions and discoveries to typical college writing assignments.

English 1101:  Fall 2008

From iPods to YouTube:  Writing and Identity in the Digital Age

This section of English 1101 will examine how identity is communicated through various forms of technology.  We will focus on the way different types of texts – from traditional written documents and advertisements to Youtube videos and blogs – can be read as arguments about modern identity.  Drawing upon our exploration of identity, community, and digital media, we will transform our discussions into different types of communication projects including a personal paper, a poster presentation, a rhetorical analysis, and an argumentative proposal.  Through an intensive process of reading, discussing, writing, and editing, we will practice the communication and critical thinking skills that you will need as a Georgia Tech student, and as a citizen of the digital world.

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